Sierra Vista, AZ, USA

©2017 BY PEPPERMINT BARN. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

Peppermint Barn is joining the good fight to keep our internet safer. To bring awareness to parents and teens of the challenges they are facing every single day through the internet and social media. Our new "Change The World" logo (coming soon) is a way for us to give back through our clothing line. For every piece of our Change The World clothing that we sell, we will donate a portion of the proceeds to a charitable organization that like us, are dedicated to protecting, informing and bringing awareness of the dangers in todays online world to families like you.

 

Our mission 

To get into schools and talk to our youth about the dangers, predators and negative activities that are all over the internet.

To teach them to protect themselves online.

To help parents understand social media apps and what their kids are "really" seeing.

To help parents learn how to talk with their kids about sensitive subjects.

It's time we do something about this epidemic. An epidemic that is swallowing our youth. An epidemic that is sadly desensitizing generations. It's time to change our world for the better. After all, the internet IS the world as we now know it. It can the greatest of tools, but also a deadliest of weapons. 

Past Statistics of  Youth and Pornography

New research from security technology companies suggests that children under the age of 10 now account for 1 in 10 visitors to porn video      site

  • Internet pornography has become sex education for many children.  "Particularly among younger children, exposure to pornography may be disturbing or upsetting…pornography is a poor, and indeed dangerous, sex educator." (Child Abuse Review -- 2009). 

  • The exposure of children to internet pornography is having impact on the development of harmful sexual behaviors.  The average age of first perpetration of sexual violence is 15 -16 and is associated with exposure to pornography (Prevention Science - 2017).

  •  A 2016 meta-analysis of pornography research reveals adolescent pornography consumption is significantly associated with stronger gender-stereotypical sexual beliefs, earlier sexual debut, increased casual sex behavior, and increased sexual aggression both as perpetrators and victims 
    (Peter J, Valkenburg P M. Adolescents and pornography: a review of 20 years of research. J of Sex Research. 2016; 53(4-5), 509-531.)

        Of sexually explicit content produced children aged 15 years of younger:

  • 85.9% of content was created using a webcam

  • 93.1% of content featured young girls

  • 89.9% of the total images and videos were distributed on third party websites.
    Internet Watch Foundation. (2015) “Emerging Patterns and Trends Report #1: Youth-Produced Sexual Content.” Internet Watch Foundation, in partnership with Microsoft.

  • Among youth 12–years to 14–years, 88% in the United States used the Internet.
    [26] “2008 World Internet Project survey of 13 countries revealed that among youth 12–years to 14–years, 88% in the United States used the Internet,” http://www.cdmc.ucla.edu/KS_Media_biblio_files/ Guan & Subrahmanyam 2009.pdf (accessed June 6, 2014 ).

  • 93.2% of boys and 62.1% of girls have seen online pornography before age 18.
    (http://www.familysafemedia.com/pornography_statistics.html - accessed June 6, 2014).

  • The mean age of first exposure to Internet pornography is 14.8(girls) and 14.3 (boys). [28] Chiara Sabina, Janis Wolak, and David Finkelhor, “The Nature and Dynamics of Internet Pornography Exposure for Youth,” CyberPsychology & Behavior 11, no. 6 (December 2008): 691-693. “The current study used an online survey to question a convenience sample of college students about experiences with online pornography before age 18. . . . Overall, 72.8% of participants. . . . Most exposure began when youth were ages 14-17, and boys were significantly more likely to view online pornography more often and to view more types of images. . . .Girls were significantly more likely than boys . . . to report never looking for pornography on purpose. . . .” (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/cpb.2007.0179 - accessed June 6, 2014).

  • At least 44,000 primary school children and 473,000 children between ages of 6 and 17 accessed an adult website, mostly offshore, in the month of December 2013 from a computer. (http://www.atvod.co.uk/news–consultations/news–consultationsnews/Atvod–publishes–research–showing–scale–of–underage–access–to–adult–websites (accessed June 6, 2014). The AVTOD Association for Television on Demand) research tracked the actions of youth using the internet from a desktop or laptop in December 2013. The research did not track youth accessing Internet pornography from smart phones. Most of the major offshore adult services are unregulated and allow free, unrestricted access to hard core porno to visitors of any age, including children. This includes 23 of the 25 adult websites most commonly accessed from the UK.)

         Of an online sexual imagery survey, 97% of boys had viewed pornography.

  • Of those, 23% said they tried to stop watching it but could not.

  • 13% reported content they watch has “become more and more extreme.”

       Of an online sexual imagery survey, 80% of girls aged 16-20 had watched pornography.

  • Of those, 8% felt they could not stop watching it.

       

  • Almost half (46%) of teenagers say “sending sexual or naked photos or videos is part of everyday life for teenagers nowadays.”

  • Seven out of 10 (72%) 18 year olds say “pornography leads to unrealistic attitudes to sex” and that “pornography can have a damaging impact on young people’s views of sex or relationships.”

  • Two thirds of young women (66%) and almost half of young men (49%) agree, “it would be easier growing up if pornography was less easy to access…”

  • In 2008, more than 560 college student responded to an online survey:
    -93% of boys and 62% of girls were exposed to pornography before 18.
    -14% of boys and 9% of girls were exposed to pornography before 13.
    -69% of boys and 23% of girls have spent at least 30 consecutive minutes viewing Internet pornography on at least one occasion.
    -63% of boys have done so more than once, and 35% of boys have done so on more than 10 occasions.
    -83% of boys and 57% of girls have seen group sex online.
    -69% of boys and 55% of girls have seen same-sex intercourse online.
    -39% of boys and 23% of girls have seen sexual bondage online.
    -32% of boys and 18% of girls have seen bestiality online.
    -18% of boys and 10% of girls have seen rape or sexual violence online.
    -15% of boys and 9% of girls have seen child pornography.
    Chiara Sabina, Janis Wolak, and David Finkelhor, “The nature and dynamics of Internet pornography exposure for youth,” CyberPsychology and Behavior 11 (2008): 691-693.